Memories of Angel Hill in the 50`s by Tony Fowler

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On Angel Hill there have been many changes over the years - the first one which comes immediately to mind is the amount of traffic, but more of that later. To start at the beginning, in 1949 my parents were having a house built in Green Lane and whilst this was taking place we stayed at The Lodge where my grandparents lived at that time.

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One of my first and regular errands was to the bakers on Angel Hill where Mr Leslie Woollard had a small bakery/shop at Angel House - in years gone by this had been a public inn (The Angel Inn). I used to enjoy these errands because the bread was wonderfully tasty and I could not resist nibbling the crust - usually I had eaten most of this before completing my errand!
I used to cycle to the nearest school at Stonham Aspal which I attended for a year or so whilst Hill View was being built – there was very little in the way of traffic to worry cyclists then! Also for film goers, there was a film show every Thursday night in Stonham Aspal Village Hall which was mainly aimed at us school kids, usually a cowboy or Flash Gordon film- all for the princely sum of 9d! Afterwards we would race on our bikes down to the Tap Crossroads - we would need to make sure we stopped correctly at the road junction as PC Sharman, our local bobby, had a nasty habit of waiting there to catch us out and clip our ears if we erred and rode across the junction without stopping!

I used to cycle to the nearest school at Stonham Aspal which I attended for a year or so whilst Hill View was being built – there was very little in the way of traffic to worry cyclists then! Also for film goers, there was a film show every Thursday night in Stonham Aspal Village Hall which was mainly aimed at us school kids, usually a cowboy or Flash Gordon film- all for the princely sum of 9d! Afterwards we would race on our bikes down to the Tap Crossroads - we would need to make sure we stopped correctly at the road junction as PC Sharman, our local bobby, had a nasty habit of waiting there to catch us out and clip our ears if we erred and rode across the junction without stopping! Whilst on the entertainment front, a village hop or dance would regularly be held at the Tap/Brewers Arms, which took place upstairs in the Clubroom to the rear of the pub.
My first memories of this area was at the Forge - now Old Forge Garage - watching Mr Jack Rush working at the Smithy. I was fascinated by the enormous leather bellows next to the forge. At this time most of his work was making and repairing farm implements and also adapting horse drawn equipment to be tractor drawn as this was a time of great change on the farms which were now rapidly becoming mechanised.

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